D23 Expo Dates Announced for 2017, possibly a week before SDCC

 

ALL OF DISNEY’S WONDERFUL WORLDS COME TOGETHER AT D23 EXPO—THE ULTIMATE DISNEY FAN EVENT—
JULY 14–16, 2017, IN ANAHEIM, CALIF.

 

Advance Tickets on Sale July 14, 2016, for the Biggest Disney Fan Event Ever

All the magic and excitement of the past, present, and future of Disney entertainment will come together once again when D23: The Official Disney Fan Club presents D23 Expo 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center the weekend of July 14–16. Each of Disney’s magical worlds will unite under one roof to celebrate what’s new and what’s on the horizon from theme parks, television, music, gaming, and films, including Pixar, Star Wars, and Marvel.

 

Highlights planned for D23 Expo include the Disney Legends Ceremony, which honors the talented men and women who have made significant contributions to the Disney legacy; an all-new exhibit curated by the Walt Disney Archives; D23 Expo’s costume contest, Mousequerade, showcasing the most creative designs by fans; the D23 Expo Emporium, where Disney fans can buy, sell, and trade Disney collectibles, memorabilia, merchandise, and more; and the D23 Expo Design Challenge. (Details on the Design Challenge and Mousequerade will be forthcoming.)

 

The 2017 Expo will feature a massive show floor full of immersive experiences and special opportunities to see what’s next for Disney around the world—and guests may run into their favorite Disney stars, characters, Imagineers, animators, and filmmakers. StagePass, the popular ticket distribution system that allows attendees to obtain guaranteed seats for some of Expo’s most popular presentations, and StorePass, which allows priority entry to select shopping venues at the event, will once again enhance the guest experience. Hall D23, the popular presentation and performance venue featuring more than 7,000 seats, will return, as will Stage 23, Stage 28, and Center Stage.

The fifth event follows the success of D23 Expo 2015, which drew tens of thousands of Disney fans for three star-studded days and nights. Guests were treated to appearances by such celebrities as Johnny Depp, Harrison Ford, Ellen DeGeneres, Chris Evans, Ginnifer Goodwin, and Dwayne Johnson and watched performances by Ne-Yo, Sabrina Carpenter, the cast of Teen Beach 2 and stars of Disney’s shows on Broadway. Guests previewed costumes from Star Wars: The Force Awakensand were the first to hear about the new Star Wars-themed lands coming to Disneyland and Walt Disney World Resorts. They also enjoyed a look back at Disney’s rich history through extraordinary panels, presentations, and exhibits and discovered the newest entertainment, technology, and products coming from Disney.

 

Advance tickets for D23 Expo 2017 will go on sale at D23Expo.com beginning July 14, 2016. D23 Members will receive special pricing on both one- and three-day tickets to the event, which is open to the general public. D23 Gold and Charter Members will also be entitled to special benefits at the 2017 Expo. Gold Members will also have an opportunity to purchase the Sorcerer Package, which provides a host of special benefits and amenities. Ticket prices will be announced this summer.

SDCC 2016: General Hotel Sale Moves to Random Waiting Room System

San Diego Comic-Con General Hotel Sale will take place on April 5 at 9AM PT.

However, the biggest news coming out today is that the sale is undergoing a re-vamp. The system will utilize a random waiting room for onPeak (who merged with Travel Planners), similar to EPIC Registration Waiting Room’s process.

Attendees will be e-mailed a link to onPeak’s system at least 48 hours prior to the sale (and you’ll also be able to access the URL on CCI’s site), and then be able to enter the room between 6AM-9AM PT on Tuesday, April 5, at which point they will be randomly sorted and then let through to fill out the form for their hotel preferences. You’ll also be able to call at 1-877-55-COMIC.

Once you get through, you’ll see the form – which we expect to be similar to last year’s form – where you’ll rank your six hotel choices, in order of preference. Requests will then be processed based on the order they are received – so there’s still some element of speed to the process, in addition to the randomization. According to the official FAQ, this was done, “to ensure fairness in the request and placement process”.

onPeak will let you know no later than April 8 which hotel you’ve been placed at, and you’ll have 72 hours to confirm your reservation with a 2-night deposit. Deposits are refundable for cancellations before April 30, 2016.

Also new this year, hotel rates include an $8.00 per night reimbursement to Comic-Con to help defray shuttle and convention costs (this charge is subject to change).

The General Hotel Sale is the biggest hotel sale for San Diego Comic-Con, because it’s when the hotels closest to the action (the Gaslamp District downtown, as well as several hotels by the airport and in Mission Valley that are on the shuttle list) become available to attendees at a special, discounted con rate (ranging from $178/night for one person at the Days Hotel – Hotel Circle by Seaworld, up to $384/night for the Andaz San Diego). You can view the entire list of all 50+ hotels, including prices, by clicking here.

Last year’s sale was basically an unmitigated disaster and likely the reason for these changes — with some attendees’ forms not loading correctly, some having the page take nine minutes to load at all, some receiving roommates who they had never heard of, some receiving multiple reservations, and a whole slew of other issues. We can only hope that this year’s sale runs smoother.

If you’re still considering booking an Early Bird hotel room, you have until the morning of April 5 to do so. You can check out our comparison of the two hotel sales here.

Are you autistic because you’re a geek? Or are you a geek because you’re autistic?

 Are you autistic because you’re a geek? Or are you a geek because you’re autistic? Would you even mention it during an internship interview?

I’ve been asked numerous times if my interest in technology is somehow connected to having an “autistic” brain. However, I’m reasonably certain no one had asked if technology made me autistic. Yet, the question was asked last week.

Now, I can’t really argue the point too much. I’m a techie or geek or whatever you want to call me. I’ve loved computers since I first sat down at an Atari 800. Asking a diagnosed autistic programmer about a trend among programmers? I’m not sure I can be objective.

Seeking to clarify, the programmer asked me if there was now a somewhat nonchalant, or reckless, impulse to think of all “geeks” as autistic. He described self-diagnosed Aspergers as “trendy” among some of the young programmers he has interviewed in the last year or so.

 It’s as if coding turns you into an “Aspie” somehow. It seems like these kids are linking programming and autism. You can be good programmer and just be a good programmer.

Understand, he wasn’t being mean and certainly isn’t ignorant about autism. His point was that for some reason the “Geek Syndrome” is being mentioned by young programmers during job interviews. One even told him, “I have Aspergers, so you should hire me.”

I asked if this wasn’t a bit of hyperbole. I was assured it wasn’t, and that the hiring committee at this company has been a bit taken aback by the situation.

 We’re all a little different, at least in the development side of the building. We sit in our offices and don’t always realize the rest of the building has headed home. Yeah, we’re different. But none of us ever thought we had a disorder.

I’m fairly certain that a greater percentage of programmers, engineers, scientists, and mathematicians do have “autistic” traits. I’m not alone in that assumption.

Here is a quote from Temple Grandin:

 “Is there a connection between Asperger’s and IT? We wouldn’t even have any computers if we didn’t have Asperger’s,” she declares. “All these labels — ‘geek’ and ‘nerd’ and ‘mild Asperger’s’ — are all getting at the same thing. … The Asperger’s brain is interested in things rather than people, and people who are interested in things have given us the computer you’re working on right now.”
— ComputerWorld (2 April 2008)

So, in the end, I don’t know what this trend means. Maybe more of the programmer’s colleagues have autistic traits than he realizes? Or maybe “Aspie” is a trendy way to describe the traits that have long made programmers different?

I can safely state that the computer itself and coding has not made me “more autistic” than anything else in life. If I didn’t focus my energy on computers, I’d focus on something else.

SDCC 2016: No Badge Resale for 2016

In news that should be a surprise to no one (but is still news), Comic-Con International confirmed on Twitter today what they’ve been hinting at for months (and years, really): That there will be no Badge Resale of returned badges for San Diego Comic-Con 2016, meaning if you don’t have a badge already, you’re probably out of luck.

Although CCI has been stating all year that they “don’t anticipate” the sale to happen, this is the first official confirmation it won’t be happening.

The last Badge Resale occurred in in 2013. Beginning in 2014, according to CCI, there just haven’t been enough refunds and cancellations to hold the sale again. When badges are this hard to get, and demand is this high, most want to hold onto their golden ticket. Here was the reasoning, circa 2014:

In past years Comic-Con International has been able to hold a sale of returned and unallocated badges in June. Unfortunately, due to an extremely low rate of refunds and cancellations this year, we are not able to hold a resale of Comic-Con 2014 badges. Thank you for your support and understanding.